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    • 06 Feb 2020
    • 2:00 PM - 3:00 PM
    • Live Webinar
    Register


    Register Today & You May Win a FREE BOOK!

     

    All those who register and attend the live event, will be in with a chance to win a copy of Dr. Zazie Todd’s upcoming book!


    CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT 1, IAABC 1, KPA 1

    As dogs are increasingly seen as part of the family, we also want to make them happy. In this exciting webinar, animal behaviour expert Zazie Todd will share insights from her forthcoming book Wag: The Science of Making Your Dog Happy, which features a foreword from none other than Dr. Marty Becker. The webinar will begin by looking at the role of emotions in a dog’s welfare, before sharing fascinating scientific research on dogs – and practical tips you can use with your own or clients’ dogs.

    The webinar will cover topics important for dog trainers and dog owners, including reasons to use reward-based training methods, why some enrichment should involve the nose, and why dogs play. As well, we will look at the important role of the owner in providing a secure base for their pet, and why this shows you should comfort a fearful dog (if they want it).

    Learning objectives:

    • Understand the role of positive emotions (happiness) in dogs’ welfare
    • Know why it is better to use reward-based training methods
    • Identify ways to apply recent scientific knowledge in puppy socialization and dog training
    • Develop tips for having happier dogs


    About The Presenter

    Dr. Zazie Todd

    Dr. Zazie Todd is the creator of Companion Animal Psychology, a blog about how to have happier cats and dogs (according to science). She has a PhD in Psychology, an MFA Creative Writing, and is an honors graduate of the prestigious Academy for Dog Trainers. She takes dogs and cats as clients through her business Blue Mountain Animal Behaviour. She has a Psychology Today blog called Fellow Creatures, and has also written about pets for Pacific Standard, The Psychologist, and Reader’s Digest. Her book, Wag: The Science of Making Your Dog Happy, will be published by Greystone Books in February 2020.

    • 25 Feb 2020
    • 1:00 PM - 2:30 PM
    • GoToWebinar
    Register


    CEUs: PPAB 1.5



    Registered for the live event, get busy and cannot make it?

    Don't worry, you will automatically receive a recording!


    Re-think Trigger Stacking - Shedding some (candle) light on triggers for behaviours we wish to modify or change


    TTouch Instructor Edie-Jane Eaton has shared her ‘candle’ concept for many years.  We may all be aware of the term ‘trigger stacking’ but Edie-Jane’s brilliant analogy helps canine guardians look more closely at the multiple ‘candles’ that may be burning for a dog that is struggling to learn or cope with his environment and human led activities.

    Several candles may be alight due to internal problems such as pain, patterns of tension through the body, the environment at home including slippery floors, noise sensitivity, the games that are played and the way a dog is touched long before more candles are lit once out in the big wide world. 

    Whilst it may not be possible to blow out every candle, there is a lot that we can do to help our clients snuff out the flames, reducing ‘ heat’ and enabling a dog to settle and learn. 

    This webinar presentation will also include the following learning objectives

    1. The link between posture and behaviour
    2. Introduction to ACE Free Work
    3. Simple leash handling techniques to reduce body tension



    About The Presenter


    Sarah Fisher

    Tilley Farm, Farmborough,


    Sarah Fisher is a canine and equine behaviour advisor. She has worked with animals for over twenty years and incorporates some of the elements of the Tellington TTouch method in her work. She is experienced with a wide range of breed types and teaches staff workshops for many of the UK’s animal welfare organisations including Battersea. She has also worked in Europe teaching staff workshops for shelters including SPCA Malta and GIA (Romania) and has taught workshops and clinics for dog trainers and behaviourists in Holland, Greece, Switzerland, Italy, Austria, South Africa, Ireland, Romania and Poland.

    Sarah gives presentations on a variety of topics at dog training and behaviour seminars in the UK and abroad, and is a regular speaker at the annual Dog Behaviour Conference. She also conducts behaviour assessments for private clients, animal welfare organisations and court cases.

    Sarah is a published author and has participated in numerous television and radio programmes over the years including the recent Nightmare Pets SOS for BBC1. She runs courses under the name Animal Centred Education (ACE) for trainers, groomers, veterinary nurses, physiotherapists and animal behaviour counsellors who wish to broaden their expertise by learning detailed observations combined with Free Work, and techniques inspired by other professionals working in the world of animal welfare and behaviour.

    • 03 Apr 2020
    • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
    • Live Webinar
    Register


    CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT (pending), IAABC (pending), KPA (pending)


    Registered for the live event, get busy and cannot make it?

    Don't worry, you will automatically receive a recording!

    Welcome to the age of genetic testing! Suddenly panels of genetic tests for dogs are relatively affordable for the average pet owner. These tests claim to tell you what your dog’s breed ancestry is (for those of us with mystery mixes) and to give you a heads-up about possible health issues. However, although similar direct-to-consumer testing is carefully regulated for humans, there is no regulation in place for them in veterinary medicine. Additionally, while trained genetic counselors are available to help interpret these results for your human family, no such speciality exists among veterinarians, and general practice veterinarians are not typically trained in this area. How much can we trust the results of these tests? Are some tests or companies more reliable than others? Dr. Hekman is a veterinarian and a genomics researcher who studies canine genetics. She will explain how these tests work, and will build on that explanation to explain the differences between various products, and which products are helpful in which situations.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Be able to read canine ancestry results ("what breeds are in your mix?") with an understanding of which results are more or less reliable, and why.
    • Evaluate different genetic testing companies with an understanding of which products are better for your needs.
    • Understand and explain differences between health test results with traditional at risk/carrier/clear status versus those with more complex interpretation.
    • Describe the basics of how genetic testing works.

    About The Presenter


    Dr. Jessica Hekman, DVM, PhD

    Jessica is a veterinary researcher who is fascinated by dog behavior. After eleven years working as a computer programmer, she decided to go back to school to research the causes of behavior problems in dogs. She received her veterinary degree in 2012 from the Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine in Massachusetts, where she also received a Master's degree for her work on stress behaviors in hospitalized dogs. After graduation, she completed a year-long internship specializing in shelter medicine at the University of Florida Maddie's Shelter Medicine Program. She received her PhD in genetics at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, studying a group of foxes (often known as the "Siberian silver foxes") which have been bred over many generations to be friendly to humans. She is currently working at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard as a postdoctoral associate, studying the genetics of behavior in pet dogs through the Darwin's Ark project and the Working Dogs Project. Her ultimate goal is to find genetic causes of fearfulness in dogs, to work with behaviorally challenged shelter dogs, and to help people better understand the science behind dog behavior. She also frequently teaches online classes and webinars about canine genetics and behavior. Jessica lives in Raymond, NH with her husband and three dogs. You can follow her on Twitter @dogzombieblog or on Facebook at facebook.com/dogzombieblog.



    • 18 Apr 2020
    • 9:00 AM
    • 19 Apr 2020
    • 4:30 PM
    • Tampa, FL
    Register


    A 2-Day Workshop with Leslie McDevitt

    Reactive to Relaxed: Next Steps in Control Unleashed 

    CEUS: PPAB 12, CCPDT 13, IAABC Working: 15 Auditor: 12

    Both Working Spots & Auditor Spots Available

    Daily Schedule

    9:00 AM – 4:30 PM, with breaks at 10:30 AM-10:45 AM (refreshments), 12 Noon-1 PM (lunch) and 2:30 PM-2:45 PM (refreshments).



    Come learn what's new in Leslie McDevitt's groundbreaking Control Unleashed training program!

    In this workshop, Leslie will teach material from her newest book Control Unleashed: Reactive to Relaxed.

    Working dogs will enjoy discovering they can make choices and control outcomes with counter conditioning games such as Pattern Games, Voluntary Sharing, and Requested Approach Training. Using these games and other foundational training from the Control Unleashed program, we will explore how to use voluntary or 'start-button' behavior to empower anxious or reactive dogs to direct their own learning experience.


    Leslie McDevitt MLA CDBC CPDT-KA

    Leslie is a dog behavior consultant, author, and speaker who specializes in creating operant counter conditioning procedures to empower working, performance, and pet dogs to feel safe and comfortable so they can function confidently in stressful environments. She has taught the material from her groundbreaking book Control Unleashed: Creating a Focused and Confident Dog to students all over the world, and her books have been translated into multiple languages. She has also presented at various conferences including Clicker Expo, Penn Vet Working Dog Conference, The UK Puppy Conference, and is looking forward to her debut at PPG.


    Workshop Location

    This event is sponsored and hosted at the DogSmith Training Center & DogNostics Career Center. The facility is a 2000 square foot fully air-conditioned indoor training room on 24 acres, with Kings Lake as a backdrop. RVs are welcome but there is no water or power hookup. The confirmation email gives local accommodation details and directions to the facility. See pictures here . Event location is 9122 Kenton Road, Wesley Chapel. FL 33545

    • 05 Jun 2020
    • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
    • Live Webinar
    Register


    CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT (pending), IAABC (pending), KPA (pending)


    Registered for the live event, get busy and cannot make it?

    Don't worry, you will automatically receive a recording!

    So you have a shy dog - one who's easily frightened of strange people or places, or maybe even one who sits at home IMAGINING what horrible thing might happen next. Is this because of genetics? Or did you mess up somehow? In this webinar, Jessica will talk about the biology behind anxiety: the roles of genetics, early environment (as early as in mom's uterus!), and socialization.

    Spoiler alert: you didn't mess up. But this webinar will help you understand better where your dog is coming from and help you think through the many different puzzle pieces that made her who she is. Jessica will also provide concrete suggestions for breeders, puppy buyers, and working dog trainers to help minimize the chances of producing or buying anxious dogs.

    Learning Objectives:

    • List the different methods by which parents pass information on to their offspring, which might make offspring more or less anxious

    • Discuss the importance of mild stress, but not trauma, in early life

    • Explain how genetics and early life experiences can interact to result in adult anxiety

    • Describe the pre-fear period in puppies and explain its relevance to adult anxiety

    • List some negative effects of stress in terms of health and well-being

    About The Presenter


    Dr. Jessica Hekman, DVM, PhD

    Jessica is a veterinary researcher who is fascinated by dog behavior. After eleven years working as a computer programmer, she decided to go back to school to research the causes of behavior problems in dogs. She received her veterinary degree in 2012 from the Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine in Massachusetts, where she also received a Master's degree for her work on stress behaviors in hospitalized dogs. After graduation, she completed a year-long internship specializing in shelter medicine at the University of Florida Maddie's Shelter Medicine Program. She received her PhD in genetics at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, studying a group of foxes (often known as the "Siberian silver foxes") which have been bred over many generations to be friendly to humans. She is currently working at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard as a postdoctoral associate, studying the genetics of behavior in pet dogs through the Darwin's Ark project and the Working Dogs Project. Her ultimate goal is to find genetic causes of fearfulness in dogs, to work with behaviorally challenged shelter dogs, and to help people better understand the science behind dog behavior. She also frequently teaches online classes and webinars about canine genetics and behavior. Jessica lives in Raymond, NH with her husband and three dogs. You can follow her on Twitter @dogzombieblog or on Facebook at facebook.com/dogzombieblog.



    • 07 Aug 2020
    • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
    • Live Webinar
    Register


    CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT (pending), IAABC (pending), KPA (pending)


    Registered for the live event, get busy and cannot make it?

    Don't worry, you will automatically receive a recording!

    Veterinarians used to routinely recommend that your dog be neutered (spayed or castrated) at 6 months of age.  That recommendation has been questioned in the past decade as information about the possible health consequences of early age neuter (or neuter at any age) comes to light.

    Jessica Hekman, DVM, PhD, will discuss what we know about the relationship of spay/neuter timing and changes in the risk of development of cancer and/or of orthopedic injuries such as cranial cruciate ligament disease (CCL tear).  She will also talk about how spay/neuter can affect behavior, for better or worse.  She will specifically discuss some recent studies and will detail problems designing effective studies to ask these questions. She will also cover alternative approaches to the traditional spay/neuter surgery. If you are wondering when, or if, you should neuter your dog, make your decision based on facts, not emotions.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Interpret recent findings about spay/neuter outcomes in light of what those studies can actually tell us
    • Make reasoned decisions about the risk of cancer/orthopedic disease and early spay/neuter
    • List alternatives to traditional spay/neuter and compare their pros and cons to traditional spay/neuter
    • RELAX about this decision!

    About The Presenter


    Dr. Jessica Hekman, DVM, PhD

    Jessica is a veterinary researcher who is fascinated by dog behavior. After eleven years working as a computer programmer, she decided to go back to school to research the causes of behavior problems in dogs. She received her veterinary degree in 2012 from the Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine in Massachusetts, where she also received a Master's degree for her work on stress behaviors in hospitalized dogs. After graduation, she completed a year-long internship specializing in shelter medicine at the University of Florida Maddie's Shelter Medicine Program. She received her PhD in genetics at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, studying a group of foxes (often known as the "Siberian silver foxes") which have been bred over many generations to be friendly to humans. She is currently working at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard as a postdoctoral associate, studying the genetics of behavior in pet dogs through the Darwin's Ark project and the Working Dogs Project. Her ultimate goal is to find genetic causes of fearfulness in dogs, to work with behaviorally challenged shelter dogs, and to help people better understand the science behind dog behavior. She also frequently teaches online classes and webinars about canine genetics and behavior. Jessica lives in Raymond, NH with her husband and three dogs. You can follow her on Twitter @dogzombieblog or on Facebook at facebook.com/dogzombieblog.



    • 02 Oct 2020
    • 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
    • Live Webinar
    Register


    CEUs: PPAB 1, CCPDT (pending), IAABC (pending), KPA (pending)


    Registered for the live event, get busy and cannot make it?

    Don't worry, you will automatically receive a recording!

    Anxiety is a major problem for many pet dogs. What happens in your dog's brain and body when something scares her? How long can you expect her stress response to last?

    In this webinar, Jessica Hekman, DVM, PhD, will talk about the stress response in dogs. She will explain the original evolutionary purpose of the stress response; what the hormones involved in it (like cortisol) do in the body; the difference between acute and chronic stress and the different effects they have on dogs' health; and what we know about how long it takes the body to clear those hormones. You will definitely learn some cool stuff about how the brain works and what that means for your stressed-out dog!

    Learning Objectives:

    • Describe how the stress response functions and what its purpose is.
    • Describe health effects (both positive and negative!) for acute versus chronic stress.
    • Explain how the stress response affects the dog's brain and their ability to think clearly and behave normally.
    • Describe how long it takes the stress response to clear from the body, and list possible alternative explanations for dogs who display signs of stress longer than it takes for stress hormones to be cleared.

    About The Presenter


    Dr. Jessica Hekman, DVM, PhD

    Jessica is a veterinary researcher who is fascinated by dog behavior. After eleven years working as a computer programmer, she decided to go back to school to research the causes of behavior problems in dogs. She received her veterinary degree in 2012 from the Tufts Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine in Massachusetts, where she also received a Master's degree for her work on stress behaviors in hospitalized dogs. After graduation, she completed a year-long internship specializing in shelter medicine at the University of Florida Maddie's Shelter Medicine Program. She received her PhD in genetics at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, studying a group of foxes (often known as the "Siberian silver foxes") which have been bred over many generations to be friendly to humans. She is currently working at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard as a postdoctoral associate, studying the genetics of behavior in pet dogs through the Darwin's Ark project and the Working Dogs Project. Her ultimate goal is to find genetic causes of fearfulness in dogs, to work with behaviorally challenged shelter dogs, and to help people better understand the science behind dog behavior. She also frequently teaches online classes and webinars about canine genetics and behavior. Jessica lives in Raymond, NH with her husband and three dogs. You can follow her on Twitter @dogzombieblog or on Facebook at facebook.com/dogzombieblog.



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DogNostics is the sister company to and provides the key education for DogSmith Licensed professionals. 


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